Sunday, April 23, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas and Dido, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Incitas crabrones (English: You're stirring up hornets).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Amori finem tempus, non animus facit (English: It is time that puts an end to love, not the mind).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ad Graecas calendas (English: On the Greek calends; from Adagia 1.5.84 ... which is to say, "never" because the Greek calendars did not have calend days).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Omnia idem pulvis: Al is one self dust or asshes. From earth wee came, and to earth wee shall. Yea the scripture saith that asshes wee be, and to asshes we shall reverte. Nowe amongest asshes or dust I pray you, what greate difference is ther? How will ye discerne the asshes of a Kinge, or an Emperour, of a Duke, of a great Bishop, from the asshes of a cobler, yea of a begger..

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Deum Nihil Latet. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Optimum medicamentum quies.
Rest is the best medicine.

Res immoderata cupido.
Desire is a limitless thing.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Struthiocamelus Perfidus , the story of a hypocritical ostrich (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Divitiae et Simulacrum Sacrum, a paradoxical fable.

Homo et Statua

Words from Mythology. For more about HYPNOS and HYPNOTIC, see this blog post.



Thursday, April 20, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Sabine Women Making Peace, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Meo contentus sum (English: I am content with what I have).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Litteris absentes videmus (English: We see people who are absent through letters).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Pomum compunctum cito corrumpit sibi iunctum (English: A bruised fruit quickly spoils the fruit next to it).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Aquae furtivae dulciores sunt, et panis absconditus suavior (Proverbs 9:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Iustum Petito. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ito bonis avibus.
Go with good omens.

O fallax rerum copia!
O the deceitful abundance of things!

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Iuppiter et Apollo , a fable about the Olympian gods (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ursae Catuli et Leaena, a fable about bear cubs being "licked into shape."


Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Old Greek Nature Stories by F. A. Farrar.



Monday, April 17, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Arachne, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is In libris libertas (English: In books, freedom).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Perdimus anguillam dum manibus stringimus illam (English: We lose the eel when we squeeze it with our hands).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Qui ambulat in tenebris, nescit quo vadat (English: He who walks in the shadows knows not where he goes).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Κακὸν δῶρον ἴσον ζημία (English: A bad gift is equivalent to a loss).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Lex et Iustitia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Amor caecus.
Love is blind.

Faciam meo modo.
I will do it in my way.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Ciconia et Uxor Eius, a sobering story of domestic violence (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cicada et Noctua, a story about a noisy neighbor.

Noctua et Cicada

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἐποίησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν ἄνθρωπον κατ᾽ εἰκόνα θεοῦ. Creavit Deus hominem ad imaginem suam. God created man in his own image.


Friday, April 14, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 14

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

I was out of town for most of this week at a fabulous meeting organized by CanvasLMS. Are there any Canvas users out there in the Bestiaria audience? I have never been a fan of learning management system software, but I am a fan of Canvas — and specifically the Canvas teacher community. So, this week Canvas brought a group of teachers to their headquarters in Utah, which is where I saw this HOC EST STULTUM poster.

We trust you to do your job and to do it well. We hold you accountable and hope you hold us accountable. We have a clear "TELL US IF WE'RE DOING SOMETHING STUPID" policy. 

Isn't that great?


They had a lot of other excellent posters on the walls of their offices too! And if you are a Canvas user and want to connect at the Community, you can find me there; here's my Community blog.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodevicesimum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Narcissus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Scienter utor (English: I enjoy things wisely).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnium rerum vicissitudo (English: There is change in all things)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae (English: Tere is no great talent without an admixture of madness.). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is A fronte praecipitium, a tergo lupi (English: A cliff ahead, wolves behind; from Adagia 3.4.94 ... it's like "between a rock and a hard place," but with wolves!).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Orbis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




Quam felix vita transit sine negotiis!
How happily life goes by when you don't have work to do!

Oderint, dum metuant.
Let them hate, so long as they fear.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo, Vacca, Capra, et Ovis, the famous story of the lion's share.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Ursus et Apes, a story about how an angry person is his own worst enemy (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Ursus et Apes

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes a Gallo Auxilium Implorans, with links to the audio and to the blog post.


Sunday, April 9, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 9

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Idus Apriles.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Zeus and Semele, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Occasio premenda (English: Opportunity should be pursued).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Miserrimum est arbitrio alterius vivere (English: To live at another's man whim is the most wretched thing of all).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Zaleuci lex (English: A law of Zaleucus; from Adagia 2.10.63 ... Zaleucus of Locris was supposedly the author of the first Greek law code, which was proverbial for its severity; for example, if someone was convicted of adultery, their eyes were gouged out as punishment).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Avarus nisi cum moritur, nil recte facit: A covertouse man doth no man good, but whan he dieth. They that give them selves onlie to the hourdinge up of money, be profitable to no body while they live. Only theyr death bringeth pleasure and profite to theyr heyres and executours.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Virtuti Mors Nocere Non Potest. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Lege totum si vis scire totum.
Read it all if you wish to know it all.

Cum audace non eas in via.
Do not travel with a bold companion.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Olea et Cucurbita, a fable about taking things slow (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ursa et Vulpes, a fable about hypocrisy.

Ursus Superbus et Vulpes

Growth Mindset Memes. For more about this growth cat, see this blog post. Discat, qui nescit, nam sic sapientia crescit. Let him learn who does not know, for in this way does knowledge grow.


Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 4

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Nonas Apriles.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Seven Against Thebes, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Vince malum patientia (English: Conquer evil with patience).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Abluit manus manum (English: One hand washes another).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ex frixis pullus ovis nunquam venit ullus (English: No chicken ever comes from fried eggs).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Beati qui esuriunt et sitiunt iustitiam, quoniam ipsi saturabuntur (Matt. 5:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Virtus Immortalis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Fac hodie: fugit haec non reditura dies.
Do it today: this day runs away, not to return.

Post tenebras spero lucem.
After the darkness, I hope for light.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpes et Uva, the famous story of the supposedly sour grapes.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Leo Iratus et Puteus, in which anger is a lion's undoing (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Leo et Puteus

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἐλέφαντα ἐκ μυίας ποιεῖς. Elephantem ex musca facis. You're making an elephant out of a fly.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 1

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Kalendae Apriles, the Kalends of April.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ajax and Cassandra, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Parta labore quies (English: Repose resulting from hard work).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus (English: Don't tickle a sleeping dragon).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Funiculus triplex non facile rumpitur (English: A triple rope is not easily broken).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἁμ' ἕπος, ἅμ' ἔργον (English: No sooner said than done).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Gloria Umbra Virtutis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Diligite inimicos vestros.
Love your enemies.

Inimici diligendi sunt, sed cavendi.
Love your enemies, but watch out.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pater, Filius, et Asinus, a fable about how you can't please everyone (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Gallina et Ova Serpentis, a fable about a foolish hen.

Gallina et Hirundo

Words from Mythology. For more about the mythological Narcissus and modern-day narcissists, see this blog post.


Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: March 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Apriles.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Scylla, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Sorte contentus (English: Content with my fate).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Historia magistra vitae (English: History is the teacher of life)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dimittis pullos sub custodia vulpis (English: You're leaving the chickens in the care of the fox). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Asinus stramenta mavult quam aurum (English: The donkey prefers straw to gold; from Adagia 4.8.38... and like the rooster who prefers a barleycorn to a gemstone, you can decide if that donkey is foolish or wise).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Virtus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Discamus veluti simus de tempore tuti.
Let us learn as if we were safe from time.

Messe tenus propria vive.
Live within your harvest.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mercurius, Homo, et Formicae, a story about how everything is relative (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mus et Montes, a fable about "fake news."

Mons Parturiens (2)

Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church.




Friday, March 24, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: March 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Apriles.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Dionysus and Ariadne, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Domi manendum (English: It's better to stay home).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Beneficia plura recipit, qui scit reddere (English: Someone who knows how to do favors will get more of them).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Gygis annulus (English: The ring of Gyges; from Adagia 1.1.96, which you can read about at Wikipedia).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Omnium rerum vicissitudo est: The worlde chaungeth every daye, every thing hath his course. It ys a proverbe by the which ys signified that yn this worlde ys nothinge stable permanent nor durable, but lyke as the sea doth contynuallye flowe and ebbe, so do all thinges yn this world dayly chaunge, nowe up, nowe down, nowe mery, nowe sadde, nowe frynde, now foe, nowe accepted and anon out of favoure.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Praemium et Poena. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:


Cupimus negata.
We desire what is denied to us.

Latent futura.
The future things are hidden.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Ranae Duae et Puteus, a story of two frogs: one reckless and one cautious (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Rusticus et Coluber, a story of how no good deed goes unpunished!

rusticus et coluber

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἐξέτεινεν Αβρααμ τὴν χεῖρα αὐτοῦ λαβεῖν τὴν μάχαιραν. Extenditque manum, et arripuit gladium. And Abraham stretched forth his hand and took the knife.