Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Philemon and Baucis, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Periculum fortitudine evasi (English: By my bravery, I have escaped danger).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nemo nascitur artifex (English: No one is born a master craftsman).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Si gradus est altus, gravior fiet tibi saltus (English: The higher your position, the heavier will be your fall).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Vade ad formicam, o piger, et considera vias eius et disce sapientiam (Proverbs 6:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dis Superis Par. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Sua cuique voluptas.
To each his own pleasure.

Petite, et dabitur vobis.
Ask, and it will be given to you.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Taurus et Culex , a fable about a boastful gnat (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Iuvencus et Rusticus, the story of a recalcitrant calf.

rusticus et iuvencus

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Αἱ Ἰβύκου γέρανοι. Ibyci grues. The cranes of Ibycus.


Sunday, May 21, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Actaeon Attacked by His Dogs, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ex sudore vultus (English: By the sweat of my brow).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Vacca, quae multum boat, parum lactis habet (English: A cow who moos a lot has little milk).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nemo propheta acceptus est in patria (English: No prophet is accepted in his homeland).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Μαχαίρᾳ μὴ πῦρ σκαλεύειν (English: Don't stir the fire with a sword).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Prudentia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Loquere audacter.
Speak boldly.

Vive tua sorte contentus.
Live and be content with your lot in life.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Alata, a fable about being careful what you ask for (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Avara et Gallina, a variation on the goose that laid the golden egg, but this time with a typical chicken.

Mulier et Gallina Obesa

Words from Mythology. For more about the CORNUCOPIA, see this blog post.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Bull, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper vigilans (English: Always watchful).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Tempus magistrorum optimus (English: Time is the best of teachers)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Non nova sed nove (English: Not new things, but in a new way). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Equo senescenti minora admove (English: Load less on the old horse; from Adagia 2.8.52).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Respiciendus Est Finis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ultra aspicio.
I look beyond.

Diversis diversa placent, et sua gaudia cuique.
Different people like different things,
and each person has their own pleasures.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Sanctus Petrus et Rusticus , a medieval version of the Aesop's fable that usually features Heracles... with Saint Peter in the hero's place (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpecula et Tintinnabulum, a fable about how appearances, and sounds, can be deceiving.

Vulpes et Tympana

Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Greek and Roman Ghost Stories by Lacy Collison-Morley. There's also an audiobook version of this one!

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 13

Here is a roun-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Idus Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Jason and Medea, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Minime iudica (English: Do not judge).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Deliberando saepe perit occasio (English: Often opportunity is lost while pondering).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Fuimus Troes (English: We were the Trojans; from Adagia 1.9.50).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Multis ictibus deiicitur quercus: With many strokes is an Oke overthrowen. Nothing is so strong, but by little and little may be brought downe. Wherfore yong men ought not to be discouraged by the greatnesse of an enterprise, so it be honest, for by continuance, seme it never so hard, it may be reclaimed and overcome.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Melius Consilium Quam Vires. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Vive in diem.
Live for the day.

Sic fuit, est, et erit: similis similem sibi quaerit.
Thus it was, is, and will be: like seeks like.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Cervus et Amici Eius, a "with friends like these, who needs enemies?" type of fable (with a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Aranea et Hirundo, the story of an overly ambitious spider.

Aranea et Hirundo

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: κἀγὼ πορεύομαι πρὸς σὲ ἐν ὀνόματι κυρίου σαβαωθ. Ego autem venio ad te in nomine Domini exercituum. I come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts.


Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 9

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I took a week off to celebrate the start of my summer, but I'm back, and except for some vacationing, I should be Latinizing pretty regularly this summer! And on't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Idus Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Arion, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Veritas omnia vincit (English: Truth overcomes all things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Sol omnibus lucet (English: The sun shines on everyone).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Non sit neglecta servi sententia recta (English: Don't ignore the honest opinion of a servant).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Qui cum sapientibus graditur, sapiens erit (Prov. 13:20). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Noli Differre. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscere potum.
Drink the whole glass, if you want to know the drink.

Somnum ne rumpe leoni.
Disturb not the lion's sleep.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Alauda, Pulli, et Agri Dominus, the story of a wise mama-bird (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Asinus Leonis Pelle Indutus, the famous fable of a self-important donkey.

Asinus in Pelle Leonis

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes Vincta et Gallus , with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Vulpes et Gallus

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Nonas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Antigone, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post spinas palma (English: After thorns, the palm of victory).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Echinus partum procrastinat (English: The hedgehog delays giving birth ... but that's a bad idea, because the babies get more and more prickly as time goes by).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Non nobis solum nati sumus (English: We are not born for ourselves alone).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Τοῖς σεαυτοῦ πτεροῖς ἥλως (English: You are captured by your own feathers... like the eagle in Aesop's fable).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Intentus in Unum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ubi amici, ibi sunt opes.
Where friends are, there is wealth.

Nemo nascitur sapiens, sed fit.
No one is born wise, but he becomes wise.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Leo et Tauri Duo , a story of "divide and conquer" (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Equus et Asinus, Pugnantes, a story about "how the ighty are fallen."

Equus Superbus et Asinus

Growth Mindset Memes. For more about this growth cat, see this blog post. Perge audacter! Proceed boldly!


Friday, April 28, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Venus and Pygmalion's Statue, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper liber (English: Always free).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Littera custos historiae (English: Writing is the guardian of history)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Est unusquisque faber ipsae suae fortunae (English: Each and every person is the maker of his own luck). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Camelus desiderans cornua, etiam aures perdidit (English: Hoping for horns, the camel lost its ears, too; from Adagia 3.5.8, based on the Aesop's fable about the camel).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sine Timore. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Honos habet onus.
Public office is a burden.

Veni, vidi, vici.
I came, I saw, I conquered.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Canes et Corium, a fable about greed.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pirata et Alexander Rex, in which a pirate speaks truth to power (this fable has a vocabulary list).


GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἄκουε τοῦ τέτταρα ὦτα ἔχοντος. Audi quatuor habentem aures. Listen to the one who has four ears.


Thursday, April 27, 2017

Special Edition: Evan Millner at Patreon

I'll have a regular edition of the Bestiaria tomorrow, but I wanted to share here today an email I received from Evan Millner, whose work I have watched and admired for many (MANY) years now. He is using Patreon to support his work, and I am guessing some readers of this blog might be interested in Evan's new home on the Internet. I've pasted in Evan's email below:


For those of you who have not yet heard, on April 14th 2017, Latinum moved to Patreon; https://www.patreon.com/latinum

Following mypodcast.com ceasing trading in 2010, the Latinum Podcast was homeless, and went into hibernation. As you may know, some materials were still available on Payloadz, but I was no longer regularly creating and uploading new materials.

This is all changing!

What is Patreon? Patreon is a type of crowd-funding website, for funding ongoing projects (unlike Kickstarter, which is for big one-off projects).

You can become a patron for $1 or more (you decide) per month; this gives you access to the entirety Latinum's extensive, and growing Latin Streaming Catalogue, which you can find here:
https://www.patreon.com/posts/index-to-latinum-8810343

I have now transferred the bulk of my audio material onto Patreon's site; including material not previously released; there are already regular releases of new recordings.

I have also set up a download catalogue.

For downloads (the kind of download that is also available on Payloadz) there is a higher tier for access to the download catalogue. (This, of course, also gives access to the streaming catalogue).

I am pleased that the number of patrons is growing fast.

If you have not already signed up, would you consider becoming a patron? The funds from my patrons will help me set aside time for working regularly on Latin recording and production; if it goes very well, possibly even as my main activity.

You can find Latinum on Patreon at:
https://www.patreon.com/latinum

Please consider becoming a supporter.

Kind regards,

Evan

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas and Dido, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Incitas crabrones (English: You're stirring up hornets).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Amori finem tempus, non animus facit (English: It is time that puts an end to love, not the mind).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ad Graecas calendas (English: On the Greek calends; from Adagia 1.5.84 ... which is to say, "never" because the Greek calendars did not have calend days).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Omnia idem pulvis: Al is one self dust or asshes. From earth wee came, and to earth wee shall. Yea the scripture saith that asshes wee be, and to asshes we shall reverte. Nowe amongest asshes or dust I pray you, what greate difference is ther? How will ye discerne the asshes of a Kinge, or an Emperour, of a Duke, of a great Bishop, from the asshes of a cobler, yea of a begger..

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Deum Nihil Latet. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Optimum medicamentum quies.
Rest is the best medicine.

Res immoderata cupido.
Desire is a limitless thing.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Struthiocamelus Perfidus , the story of a hypocritical ostrich (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Divitiae et Simulacrum Sacrum, a paradoxical fable.

Homo et Statua

Words from Mythology. For more about HYPNOS and HYPNOTIC, see this blog post.



Thursday, April 20, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Sabine Women Making Peace, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Meo contentus sum (English: I am content with what I have).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Litteris absentes videmus (English: We see people who are absent through letters).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Pomum compunctum cito corrumpit sibi iunctum (English: A bruised fruit quickly spoils the fruit next to it).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Aquae furtivae dulciores sunt, et panis absconditus suavior (Proverbs 9:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Iustum Petito. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ito bonis avibus.
Go with good omens.

O fallax rerum copia!
O the deceitful abundance of things!

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Iuppiter et Apollo , a fable about the Olympian gods (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ursae Catuli et Leaena, a fable about bear cubs being "licked into shape."


Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Old Greek Nature Stories by F. A. Farrar.