Thursday, November 23, 2017

Bestiaria Latina: Special Thanksgiving Edition

Happy Thanksgiving to all! The Latin word gratia is very difficult to translate into English: it means thanks and gratitude and love and so much more, including grace ("saying grace" is saying "thank you"). You might take a few minutes just to look at the range of meanings: Lewis and Short.

And here are some Gratia-Cats you can enjoy for the holiday. :-)


Gratia gratiam parit.


GRATIA creates GRATIA.


Gratia referenda.


Return GRATIA for GRATIA.


Non gladio, sed gratia.


Not by means of the sword, but by means of GRATIA.


Beneficium et gratia vincula sunt concordiae.


A good deed and GRATIA are the cords of unity.


Gratia quando datur, studeas ut restituatur.


When GRATIA is given, make sure to do the same in return.


Super argentum et aurum gratia bona.


Above silver and gold, GRATIA is good.


In omnibus gratias agite.


In all things, do GRATIAS.



Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem undecimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Echo and Narcissus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Ora et labora (English: Pray and work hard).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Spes dabit auxilium (English: Hope will give help ... but for a different take on hope, see the next proverb!).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Spes laqueo volucres, spes captat arundine pisces (English: Hope captures birds with a net, and fish with a rod).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Sol non occidat super iracundiam vestram (Eph. 4:26). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Exempla Optima. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Frangit inertia vires.
Laziness saps your strength.

Nimium breves flores rosae.
Too brief are the flowers of the rose.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Unicornis, a story about a treacherous lion and a trusting unicorn.


PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Vulpis ad personam tragicam, a story about good looks: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de fure malo et sole, a story about evils that multiply: Latin text and English versions.



Monday, November 13, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Idus Novembres... the Ides of November!

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Diana and Endymion, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Veritate duce, progredi (English: With truth as the guide, to move forward), which I just learned is the motto of the University of Arkansas.


ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Ars varia vulpi (English: The fox has many a trick).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Pullus de nido avolat (English: The chick flies away from the nest).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὸν τὸ ἑαυτὸν γνῶναι, ἀλλὰ μακάριον (English: It is a difficult but blessed thing to know oneself).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Bis Dat, Qui Cito Dat. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Sic itur ad astra
This is how you reach the stars.

Sapientia gubernator navis.
Wisdom is the ship's navigator.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Equus, a story about the trickster tricked.

Equus et Leo Medicus

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Ranae ad solem, a fable about global warming: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de leone, vacca, capra et ove, the proverbial lion's share: Latin text and English versions.




Friday, November 10, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 10

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Achilles at Skyros, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Maiora sequor (English: I follow greater things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is In varietate voluptas (English: There is a pleasure in variety)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Non mare transisset, pavidus si nauta fuisset (English: The sailor would not have crossed the sea, if he had been afraid). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Asinus portans mysteria (English: The donkey carrying the icons; from Adagia 2.2.4, alluding to the Aesop's fable about that self-important donkey).


BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Veri Amoris Nullus est Finis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Litteris absentes videmus.
By means of letters we see those who are absent.

Caelestia sequor.
I pursue heavenly things.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo, Lepus, et Cerva, a story about a lion whose greed gets him into trouble.

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Vacca, capella, ovis, et leo, the famous story of the lion's share: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De cane et frusto carnis, a story about a greedy dog who, like the lion, comes to grief: Latin text and English versions.




Monday, November 6, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 6

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem octavum Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Polyxena at the Well, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Diligamus invicem (English: Let us love one another).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Improbe Neptunum accusat, qui iterum naufragium facit (English: It's unfair to blame Neptune for the second shipwreck).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Sine Cerere et Baccho friget Venus (English: Without Ceres and Bacchus, Venus grows cold; from Adagia 2.3.97, with Cere and Bacchus standing for bread and wine, and Venus for love).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Ignem igni ne addas: Put no fier to fier. Adde not calamitie to calamitie, leste beinge alreadie chauffed thou be yet more chauffed. Plato in his second booke of lawes, forbiddeth children the drinkinge of wine until they come to the age of xviii yeares, lest if the heate of the wine shoulde be added to the fervencie of the age, they shoulde seeme to commite fier to fier. This Proverbe is touched in Englishe, where it is saide, that wee ought not put fire to towe.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Felix Res Publica. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Neminem laede.
Harm no one.

Beatus qui invenit amicum verum.
Blessed is he who has found a true friend.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Tauri Duo, a story about the "divide and conquer" strategy.

Leo et Tauri - Osius

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Canis carnem ferens, a story about greed: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is Canis et Ovis, a story about injustice: Latin text and English versions.



Thursday, November 2, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Nonas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Judgment of Paris, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Timor omnis abesto (English: Away with all fear).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Qui audet adipiscitur (English: He who dares gets what he aims at).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Omnia transibunt! Sic ibimus, ibitis, ibunt (English: All things will pass away! So we will go, you will go, they will go).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Tu quid iudicas fratrem tuum? (Romans 14:10). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fratres Concordes. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Qui multum habet, plus cupit.
He who has much wants more.

Vultus imago animi.
The face is the portrait of the soul.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo Furens et Caprea, in which the she-goat is understandably worried about the lion.

Leo Mente Captus et Caprea

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Graculus Superbus et Pavo, a story about borrowed feathers: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de mure, de rana et de milvo, a story about natural karma: Latin text and English versions.




Monday, October 30, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 30

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Achilles and Penthesilea, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post nubila Phoebus (English: After the clouds, the sun).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Simia est simia, etiamsi purpura vestiatur (English: A monkey is a monkey, even if it's dressed in purple).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nihil invita Minerva facies (English: You will not accomplish anything if Minerva is unwilling).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀυτοῦ Ῥόδος, αὐτοῦ καὶ τὸ πήδημα (English: This here can be Rhodes, and your leap too, alluding to the Aesop's fable about the boastful traveler).


BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vicini Tecta. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Amor mundum fecit.
Love made the world.

Fruere die praesenti.
Enjoy the present day.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo Iratus et Puteus, a story about an angry lion who is his own worst enemy.

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Ranae regem petierunt, a story about foolish frogs: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De Lupo et Agno, a story about a bully who won't take "no" for an answer: Latin text and English versions.